The Croods

The Croods

Released in March 2013, The Croods is a 3D computer-animated adventure comedy produced by DreamWorks Animation.

The story follows a family of caveman, the Croods, as they live under their father’s strict care and try to survive while living under a cave. One night, the eldest daughter, Eep, defies her father’s orders by going out of the cave at night and meets a young man, Guy, that tells her about the end of the world. After a huge earthquake that destroys their cave, the Croods are forced to go up the mountain and jump in unknown territory where everything is quite strange. With the help of Guy, they try to reach a mountain far away and get to “Tomorrow”

I didn’t quite know what to expect of this movie. All I knew was it seemed funny, but I wasn’t expecting much of a story. I was quite surprised by how it turned out. The story itself is just a family meeting a new guy and trying to survive the end of the world together, but when you look deeper there is such a big meaning inside of it. For example, you can learn that it’s okay to change how you do things, to go in the unknown. I also got surprisingly attached to the characters, especially the father, which surprised me since he annoyed me at the beginning. I definitely recommend watching this movie no matter how old you are. It may be animated, which sometimes hint that it’s for kids, but it is a wonderful movie to learn lessons you might not have learned yet.

 

Until Next Time!

Young Mom ❤


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Upside Down

Upside Down

Upside Down is a romantic sci-fi movie release in USA on the 15 March 2013, from what I can gather it was originally released sometime in 2012.

In a world where there are two gravities, there is a town Up Above and a town Down Below (Up Above is like Down Below’s sky and vice versa). A young boy from Down Below manages to reach the edge of the gravities and meets a girl from Up Above. Both of them start meeting up there throughout the years and during their teens they start dating. Since contact between Up Above folks and Down Below folks is prohibited, they get caught while Adam tries to bring back Eden in her gravity safely with a rope. The rope gets cut and Eden falls to the ground in her gravity. Seeing blood come out of her head, Adam is certain she’s dead. About 10 years later, Adam learns that Eden is still alive and decides to do everything he can to get to her and see her again.

This movie is basically like Romeo and Juliet in the sense that there are two lovers from different worlds that can’t be together because of that, but they still try to make it work. What made this movie different from every star-crossed lovers movies is the fact that the different worlds isn’t just the poor vs rich that we keep seeing. Yes Up Above is richer than Down Below, but they’re also in different gravities; which means, Adam needs to find a way to be able to be in Up Above without falling back in his gravity, because when he’s in Up Above it’s like he’s filled with helium and just flies in the sky and when he gets back in his gravity he because like a rock and falls down. It was very hard to get used to that concept while watching the movie, but it was worth it. I was pleasantly surprised at how I enjoyed the movie. I didn’t think I would at first, but it became so intense when Adam started hitting road blocks that I got sucked into the story; so much that there is one question at the end that I need it to be answered.

SPOILER ALERT DO NOT READ THE REST IF YOU DON’T WANT TO BE SPOILED OF THE ENDING

In the end, Eden is in Adam’s gravity without needing some Down Below weight material stuff that Adam needed to use to be in Up Above because she’s pregnant with Adam’s babies. My question is, if the mother is from Up Above and the dad from Down Below, what will the twin’s gravity be? Another small question, once she gives birth, is Eden going to fall back in her gravity?

 

Until Next Time!

Young Mom ❤


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Oz the Great and Powerful

Oz_-_The_Great_and_Powerful_Poster

Oz the Great and Powerful was released in 2013 and is a fantasy adventure film. This movie is based on L. Frank Baum’s Oz novels. It is set 20 years before the events in the original novel and shows the origin of the famous Wizard of Oz.

Oscar Diggs is a moving circus magician that seeks greatness. He is sent off to Oz by a tornado and immediately encounters Theodora, a witch. Learning about a legend that says a powerful wizard would come and rescue everyone from the wicked witch, Oscar easily slips in the roll of said powerful wizard. Oscar needs to get rid of the wicked witch before being able to settle in the throne and access all the riches of the Emerald City.

I’m familiar with the tale of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz where Dorothy is sent to Oz by a tornado, but I’ve never actually read it or seen it so I didn’t quite feel the need to watch a movie that showed the Wizard of Oz’s origins. I did watch it though because I heard Mila Kunis was playing in the movie and I don’t regret watching it. It is a wonderful story and I love how they decided to portray the Wizard of Oz and how they included a bit of back story to the Wicked Witch of the West. I think fans of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz would enjoy watching this movie and if you’re like me and you’ve never really read that tale, than you will definitely be inclined to after watching Oz the Great and Powerful.

 

Until Next Time!

Young Mom ❤


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Bling Ring

Bling Ring

The Bling Ring is a black comedy crime film that was based on actual events. Directed by Sofia Coppola, the movie received a weighted average of 6.3/10 from the Rotten Tomatoes review website and a 66 out of 100 from Metacritic.

The movie follows a group of teenagers that seem so bored with their lives they end up stealing from celebrities’ houses. At first, it’s just Rebecca and Marc that broke in Paris Hilton’s house while she was away and stole a few things; not enough that she would notice. But then, Rebecca tells her friends what they did and they want in so she shows them how they first got in the house and the group all goes together the next time Paris is out of town. Now that they know how easy it is to get into these houses, the group starts targeting other celebrities; like Audrina Patridge and Megan Fox.

When I first heard they were doing a movie about a bunch of teenagers robbing celebrities, I thought it was such a bad idea. I didn’t know why they wanted to make a movie out of that, even though it’s based on real events! Then I saw that Emma Watson would be in it and I thought I would at least give it a try, just to see Emma. I definitely shouldn’t have watched that movie. Although Emma Watson’s performance was good, the movie was horrible. I read somewhere that they may have wanted to show the mindset of those teenagers, why they felt the need to rob these houses, but all they’ve shown is a bunch of spoiled brats bored out of their minds deciding it would be exciting to steal from celebrities.

On Rotten Tomatoes, the site’s consensus states “While it’s certainly timely and beautifully filmed, The Bling Ring suffers from director Sofia Coppola’s failure to delve beneath the surface of its shallow protagonists’ real-life crimes” and I completely agree with that statement. At first I thought either the acting was awful, or the script wasn’t well written because the movie just didn’t feel right. Now that I’ve read that statement, I think the reason why I thought the characters seemed devoid of personality is because Coppola didn’t take the time to actually give them personalities! Personally, I would never recommend this movie.

 

Until Next Time!

Young Mom ❤


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Identity Thief

Identity Thief

Released in February 2013, Identity Thief is a crime comedy directed by Seth Gordon. Getting a 19% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, it is said that it wasn’t quite as funny as it should have been and that the plotline was not well written.

Sandy Patterson is an account processor at a big company that decides, with fellow colleagues, that they are tired of being treated like crap and decide to make their own company. Sadly for Patterson, he gets charged with many bills unpaid and even gets searched for drugs all because he trusted a woman on the phone that said she was from his bank. He gave her all his information without thinking twice and now has his identity stolen. Learning this fact, Patterson decides to go fetch this woman himself in Florida and bring her to the Denver police so his name can be cleared and he doesn’t lose his new job. After finding the woman, he manages to convince her to get in the airplane with him to Denver so she can confess her crime to his boss. What she doesn’t know is that the cops will be nearby listening in on her confession. But the identity thief makes Sandy realize he hasn’t thought his plan through. With them having the same ID cards, it would be impossible for them to get in a plane, so they end up driving all the way back to Denver; which leads to many adventures.

Identity Thief was quite the comedy. At first, I was inclined to hate the woman, Diana, because of what she did to Sandy; especially since he has two daughters and they’re expecting a third baby. But as the movie rolls, we learn a bit of background story on Diana and learn her personality which obviously made me love her in the end.  Although the main characters were perfectly acted, I have to admit a little bit with Rotten Tomatoes on the plot line. The main story of them need to drive back to Denver is pretty straightforward, but some of the things happening in between and on the side don’t make much sense and aren’t explained much. For example, there’s suddenly a guy coming after Diana, but we don’t know who ordered him to search for her and why. All we know is he’s going to get 50 000$ if he brings her back to whomever wants her. Other than that, it was a pretty enjoyable movie.

 

Until Next Time!

Young Mom ❤


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The Desolation of Smaug

the desolation of smaug

Released in December 2013, The Desolation of Smaug is the second movie based on The Hobbit. With a more positive review than An Unexpeted Journey, this movie received a 75% on Rotten Tomatoes.

BULLCRAP

That is the word most used by myself while watching this movie; and it’s what I think of those reviews. This movie was so badly made I had all the trouble in the world finishing it.

First of all, remember last week when I said it was a nice change to be able to see Gandalf’s errand? Well they f-ed it up really badly! For some reason they decided the necromancer would be Sauron. Why in the world would they add Sauron in this story? He was NEVER mentioned in the book! It just doesn’t even make sense! If Sauron had been starting to gather up his Wring Raiths and his goblin/orc army, why did he take 60 fricken years to actually start searching for his ring that he apparently knew had been found?

You know that other side-story they decided to do with the white orc and Thorin? Well it loses all senses in the second movie. Because Sauron needs his army by his side, the white orc sends off another orc and a thousand goblins (or orcs I can never make the difference) to kill Thorin. They chase the dwarves at places goblins aren’t even mentioned in the book. At least in the first movie they were seen when they were mentioned in the book, even if it wasn’t in the same manner. This time they just vomited them everywhere they could and it didn’t make sense at all. Especially when they were walking on the roofs in Lake Town. How did no one hear them walking around and how did no one hear the battle that happened? Oh and how did they even cross the river to get there when the dwarves had to cross by boat?

Next up is Beorn. I was so excited for that part! It’s the most hilarious part of the book and I was certain they wouldn’t leave it out since it’s a big part of the story. They didn’t leave it out, but they didn’t do it right either. In the book, Gandalf instructs the dwarves to come in two at a time and five minutes appart. In between dwarf apparitions, Gandalf tells their tale to Beorn. Once all the dwarves arrived, they sat down for diner and talked some more about their task. The next day, Beorn is nowhere to be seen. They spend another night there and in the morning Beorn tells them he spent the day before going to check if their story was true, and seeing it was true he decided to help them out. Suggesting they go through Mirkwood since it would be faster and safer from goblins, he warns them to stay on the path, or else they would never find it again, and to avoid touching and drinking the water since it’s enchanted. Then he lends them ponies and lets them go on their way.

Mirkwood. Dear Mirkwood. How badly they made that as well. They didn’t even mention the water and they completely changed why they got off the path. It wasn’t because they lost it, it was because they saw some lights in the trees and wanted to see if there was food there since their supplies were almost empty. This is where the movie decided to introduce Legolas and Taurel. Of course they weren’t in the book; and of course they made them the love interest of the movies. It doesn’t make sense that Bilbo and Gloin see Legolas in this story because when they are in Elrond’s council in The Lord of the Rings neither of them seemed to know the other.

Then there’s my dear Filli. Of course they had to make us believe one of them was going to die. Not only just that, but they decided to somehow make a love triangle between him, Legolas and Taurel. Just the fact that because they made Filli dying of poison made three other dwarves stay behind is just so frustrating. It’s just not supposed to happen! They are not supposed to be in Lake Town when the Dragon attacks! They’re supposed to be in the mountain with all the others (I’m going to wait and see what they do in the last movie before tapping into why they’re supposed to all be in the mountain when the dragon attacks Lake Town).

About that dragon. How stupid was that chase they made? He just goes around chasing them inside the mountain determined to kill them, but then suddenly decides to go after Lake Town after being soaked in melted gold. And how in the world did Thorin know everything would still be in place for his strange plan to work? How did he know Smaug hadn’t destroyed everything while gathering the gold, because, you know, dragons always seek more gold. Bilbo was supposed to go in there once, retrieve a cup to show everyone he’d been in the treasure room, then go back to find the Arkenstone. On the second go, Smaug is awake and they start talking; which is where Smaug shows his stomach to Bilbo to prove he has no weak points. Bilbo makes the mistake of insulting Smaug before going back to the dwarves after seeing a way to kill the dragon, and that’s when Smaug decides to go block the secret entrance and attack Lake Town for helping these dwarves.

I am just so disappointed and frustrated by this movie. They decided to make three movies out of one single book and they can’t even be bothered to properly make the parts from the book. The second movie is pretty much all made up. They kept the big lines (Beorn, Mirkwood and Smaug), and invented everything else. They didn’t even take the time to make those big lines like in the book. I can’t believe people are saying this movie is better than the first one. Clearly those reviewers haven’t read the book.

 

What did you guys think of this movie?

Until Next Time!

Young Mom ❤


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The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

The_Hobbit-_An_Unexpected_Journey

An Unexpected Journey is the first of three movies based on the 1937 book The Hobbit. Released in December 2012, it received mixed reviews with some 65% here and some 58% there.

The movie starts with Bilbo Baggins writing down his adventure while his nephew Frodo tries to see what he’ writing about. The story begins with Bilbo receiving an odd visit from Gandalf, followed by a crazy evening with 13 dwarves. The next day, Bilbo finds himself enrolled in an adventure he definitely wasn’t looking for.

For one single small book to be separated in three movies, you have to expect some added material. For the most part, I’m quite satisfied with how they did the movie. There are many small details that are different from the book, as always, but in this movie you are introduced to two new side stories. One of which we learn near the end of the book, being Gandalf’s errand that he needed to do.

At a certain point in the middle of the book (not in the first movie) Gandalf leaves the dwarves and Bilbo to take care of some business. When he comes back near the end of the book, he tells them he took care of a necromancer. What they decided to do in the movies for more time is show how Gandalf took care of the necromancer.

The other major side-story added to make the movies last longer is Thorin’s history with the white orc. In the books, they just battle normal goblins and the reason why those goblins were chasing them is because the dwarves killed their king. Not because of some personal revenge of a white orc. I understand why they added that in the movie and for the first movie it blends well with the story.

All the other small details that are different from the book aren’t so bad. It’s just tiny stuff like for example at the beginning Gandalf comes back when the dwarves left Bag End to tell Bilbo he’s going to be late for the meeting they mentioned in a letter they left on the mantle (that Bilbo hadn’t seen before Gandalf showed it to him). It’s not details that affect the story too much so I won’t even try to mention them.

Overall I’m quite pleased with how they did the first part of the book. I like that they decided to show us Gandalf’s errand, although we were used to seeing him disappear and not know what he was up to since he almost never talks about his errands in The Lord of the Rings. It’s a nice change.

 

Until Next Time!

Young Mom ❤


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LotR: The Return of the King

Return of the King

The last movie in the Lord of the Rings series, The Return of the King, was released in December 2003.

There actually aren’t many differences between this movie and the books. At first I was a bit mad that the third movie started with the end of the second book, but when I stopped to think about the timeline, it fit that they put those scenes in the last movie. There are many tiny details that aren’t like in the books, but I’m only going to talk about two of the biggest ones that annoyed me the most.

The first one being the fight between Frodo and Sam right before entering the tunnel to get in Mordor. The first time I saw the movie I thought it was so strange that Frodo would defend and believe Gollum instead of Sam, now I know why it felt so strange. It never happened in the books! That scene they invented just doesn’t make sense at all in the story. Even though they pin it on the fact that the ring is starting to control Frodo’s mind, it’s still too farfetched. There is one point in the books where Frodo gets mad at Sam and tells him to back off because he thinks Sam wants the ring. But one, it didn’t happen because Gollum was influencing Frodo; and two, Frodo immediately came back to his senses and said he was sorry to Sam, that it was the ring talking.

The other big thing that annoyed me about the movie is the fact that they didn’t do the Battle of the Shire at the end. I know it would’ve made the movie even longer, but if they took out the scenes that they invented (like all the ones where we see Arwin and Elrond) they would’ve had the time to add the Battle of the Shire at the end. I felt like it was important to the story, but I guess since they killed off Saruman at the beginning instead of during the Battle of the Shire they didn’t see the point in doing that scene anymore. I still would’ve loved to see it.

Other than those two huge things for me that were annoying, there were tiny details that were just really stupid to change or to add, but I won’t get into those because it might take a while! The only tiny detail that was way stupid that I want to mention really quickly is the fact that Théoden’s army actually took the time to make tents and especially Théoden’s tent with furniture and decorations in it! Where in the world did they get those furniture and decorations? Did he seriously take the time to gather those things and set them up every night they rested while getting to Minas Tirith to fight a war? They’re supposed to be in a hurry to get there, but I guess the producers and directors decided they had the time to set up tents every night!

And I’ll stop here because I’m getting frustrated, and when I’m frustrated there’s no stopping me and this review will end up being way too long. I have to admit that it was in fact the movie that stayed the most true to the books out of the three. It still had his flaws obviously, but they didn’t feel as big as the ones in the other two movies.

 

Until Next Time!

Young Mom ❤


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Book Review

 

LotR: The Two Towers

The Two Towers, movie

The second movie in the Lord of the Rings trilogy, The Two Towers, came out in December 2002. It was one of the best reviewed films of 2002, receiving a 96% rating from Rotten Tomatoes.

I won’t go in full detail like I usually do for this review. There are just so many things wrong with this movie. As usual, the movie is good if you don’t take in consideration what was actually in the book. I think it must be the worst adaptation I’ve seen so far. There are so many details that aren’t in their proper place on the timeline and they invented so many scenes.

For example, the scene where Faramir decides to take Frodo back to Gondor so he can give the ring to his father is complete bull crap. Faramir was never ever tempted to take the ring from Frodo and he never kept Frodo from doing his mission. After about a day and a half or maybe two days in the secret cave, Faramir decided to let Frodo go on his mission.

An example of a scene not in its place on the timeline is when the Ents takeover Isengard. If I followed the story correctly, that battle happened slightly before the battle at Helm’s Deep, not at the same time. How I know this? When Gandalf and company arrive at Isengard (which they don’t even show in the second movie) after the battle in Helm’s Deep, Merry and Pippin talk about the battle and they mention that they saw the orcs coming out of Isengard when the Ents arrived at Isengard’s gate. The Ents hid themselves, waiting for the perfect moment to strike I’m guessing, when the orcs started coming out of Isengard. Once the doors closed, the Ents started taking down the walls and invading Isengard.

Another thing that annoyed me so much is when they added scenes just to make the movie more dramatic (as if the book wasn’t dramatic enough). At one point in the movie, when they’re making their way to Helm’s Deep (which, by the way, was supposed to be just the army going there. The people were supposed to be led to the Hold of Dunharrow by Éowyn), they’re attacked by orcs on wolves. That never happened in the book; and to make it even more dramatic they make us think Aragorn died falling off a cliff.

Two last notes that frustrated me are during the battle of Helm’s Deep. For one, they made Théoden so much more stubborn than he was in the book. He annoyed me so bad! He kept making awful choices that he hadn’t made in the book. The last thing is when, for some reason, they decided to add Elves in the battle. There were no Elves in the battle of Helm’s Deep! But of course, all the Elves died during the first minute of the battle.

Overall, I was just so frustrated at how they did such an awful job that I completely disconnected from the movie at about an hour left. It’s such a bad adaptation that I wonder if the script writers actually read the book. Of course, that’s only my opinion; but honestly, don’t watch the movie with the hopes of seeing what was in the book. You’ll be let down so bad.

 

What did you think of the adaptation?

Until Next Time!

Young Mom ❤


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Book Review

 

LotR: The Fellowship of the Ring

Fellowship of the ring

Directed by Peter Jackson, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, released in December 2001, is obviously based on the book of the same name written by J.R.R. Tolkien. Watching this movie was less painful than expected. Of course there are the usual skip of chapters and changing bits and pieces of the book, but it was less obvious than many other movies based on books. The perfectionist that I am noted down every bits that was different from the book, but I managed to narrow it down to about four big changes that I didn’t like.

The first one is concerning the beginning. If you’ve read the book and watched the movie, you’ll know what bothered me. They changed many parts of when Frodo is on the road after leaving Bag End, which is two chapters long. But the worst part is, after those two chapters, they actually arrive at Brandywine (if I remember the name right) and their road from there to Bree is four chapters long. Yes, ladies and gentlemen, we’ve been robbed four whole chapters. You could say that there’s not much going on in those four chapters, but it’s not quite true. Not to spoil too much of the story, for those few that still haven’t read the book, but they face near death experiences twice in those four chapters. I’ll let you decide if it was a good choice they left it out or not. Oh and a little note, they don’t actually get chased by a Black Rider at this point of the book. They hear them coming twice, but both time they hide and don’t get caught.

Once they meet up with Strider and leave for Rivendell, there’s one night where they have a huge encounter with the Black Riders. In the movie, it’s a full on fight between the Riders and Strider, but not in the book. In the book, Strider tells everyone to get closer to the fire. I suppose it’s because the Black Riders don’t like fire. But then Frodo gives in the urge of putting on the ring and that’s when the Riders see exactly where he is and they go for him. In the heat of the moment, Frodo screams something in another language and strikes the closest Rider’s feet with his sword, which surprises the Rider and makes him stab Frodo. Because they weren’t expecting resistance, they leave immediately after that.

Now this next point is something that I’ve struggled with movies based on books for a while now. The scene in Rivendell where Boromir talks to Aragorn and touches the broken blade doesn’t happen in the book. Aragorn actually carries the broken blade with him. You could think they put that scene in there to give a bit of background info on some things, but those things they want to explain get explained later on when they’re in the Council. If only they had done the council almost to the fullest (honestly, even I wouldn’t watch through Gandalf’s story!), everything would’ve been explained like in the book and for the same amount of time.

Next up is near the end of the movie. The part when Frodo takes off the ring after being attacked by Boromir is done all wrong. Strider is not supposed to see Frodo after that. Frodo decides to leave for Mordor without his friends and puts the ring back on to get a boat without them seeing him. While he gets back to where they are, they actually separated to search for him since it’s been a while since he left to think. When Aragorn reaches the top of the mountain where he thought Frodo might have gone to, he hears the Horn of Gondor and rushes to find Boromir to aid him. He arrives too late and only finds Boromir nearly dead with many dead orcs surrounding him. Before dying, Boromir tells Aragorn how he tried to take the ring from Frodo, then informs him that the orcs captured Merry and Pippin.

The only thing I have to add to this long review is the same thought I keep repeating: Why do you cut scenes from the book if you’re going to add some of your own? If they didn’t put every part where we saw Saruman preparing his army, or if they hadn’t added scenes to “explain” details that would’ve been explained anyway if they had gone by the book, they would’ve had plenty of space to put scenes of the book that people would’ve actually wanted to see. I understand it’s a long book and they can’t possibly put every detail in it, and I’m not asking them to, I’m just saying it would’ve taken them the same amount of time to do a short version of the four, nearly six, chapters they skipped instead of adding scenes that aren’t in the book.

 

What did you think of the movie, compared to the book?

Until Next Time!

Young Mom ❤


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Book Review